Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

News

The House Criminal Justice Subcommittee this past week advanced legislation that would significantly increase protections for victims  of aggravated domestic assault in Tennessee. House Bill 2692, also known as The Debbie and Marie Domestic Violence  Protection Act, would require aggravated assault suspects in certain domestic  violence cases to wear a global position monitoring system (GPS) if they were  released on bond. “For many years, Tennessee has struggled with being in the top percentile for  domestic violence, and more specially, domestic violence deaths,” said bill sponsor  State Rep. Clay Doggett, R-Pulaski. “In my time here in the legislature, I’ve tried to find legislation that would  help provide additional protections and remedies to victims, especially those of  aggravated domestic assault…. This is just another tool that we can use for victims  and law enforcement to be able to make sure there is an avenue of safety for  (them).” A GPS service provider must be able to notify a victim’s cell phone if their alleged  attacker is within a certain proximity of their location. The company would also be required to notify local law enforcement when a violation of a defendant’s bond  conditions occurred. The legislation is named in honor of Debbie Sisco and Marie Varsos. Both women  were killed in 2021 by Varsos’ estranged husband Shaun who was out on bond for  strangling his wife and threatening to shoot her a month earlier.  There were 61,637 victims of domestic violence statewide in 2022, according to  the most recent data from Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. House Bill 2692 was  scheduled to be heard in the Criminal Justice Committee on Feb. 20.

News

A Republican bill to ensure students in Tennessee are not indoctrinated bypolitical flags in the classroom advanced out of the K-12 Subcommittee at the...

Obituaries

Obituaries

Mrs. Dorothy Ann Vaughn Allison, age 81, of Morrison, TN, passed from this life on Tuesday, February 27, 2024, in Morrison, TN. Mrs. Allison...

Obituaries

Bobby Len Vann of Manchester, TN passed away at the age of 78 years old on Saturday February 3rd, 2024, at 12:35am at Nashville...

Obituaries

Mr. James “Buck” Meadows, age 69, of Manchester, TN, passed from this life Wednesday, February 21, 2024, in Nashville, TN.  Buck was born in...

News

Maintenance to perform a rolling roadblock with the help of THP to set up a lane closure to make several needed repairs to the drainage system in the median of  I-24. This will be weekend work only. Location: Grundy County Lane Closure: I-24 West Bound Mile Marker 134 to 130 #1 fast lane Dates: Weekend work only. Saturday 3/2/24, and may need Saturday 3/9/24 (if rain out on Saturday, work will be performed on  Sundays) Time: 7:00am to 5:30 pm CST Notes: 2 THP officers will be on the job site during this project.

News

Legislation has been introduced to protect financial transaction data associated  with firearm and ammunition purchases from being used to conduct mass  surveillance of law-abiding Tennesseans. House Bill 2762, also known as the Second Amendment Financial Privacy Act,  would prohibit financial institutions like banks and credit card companies from  requiring the use of a specific merchant category code (MCC) to identify  transactions that occur at firearms retailers in the state. The bill would also  prevent legal purchases at the retailers from being denied based solely on the  code as well as protect financial records of the transactions from disclosure  unless required by law. “Tennesseans should never have to worry about their legal purchases being denied  or tracked simply because they involve firearms and ammunition,” said bill sponsor  State Rep. Rusty Grills, R-Newbern.  “This legislation will increase protections for law-abiding citizens who wish to take advantage of their constitutionally-protected right to bear arms. I remain committed to defending freedom in Tennessee, which includes the Second Amendment.”  Alleged violations of the law would be investigated by the Attorney General’s Office  and could result in a civil penalty of up to $10,000 if necessary, according to the bill.  If approved, Tennessee would join a handful of other states like Florida, Idaho,  Mississippi, Montana and Texas that have already passed similar legislation.  The new law would take effect July 1.