Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

News

The exterior of the Hands on Science Center recently had an exterior upgrade. Here are some of the photos the Hands on Science took...

News

Members of the 113th General Assembly on Thursday fulfilled their constitutional  duty with the passage of a $52.8 billion balanced budget for the 2024-25 fiscal year. This year’s budget highlights lawmakers’ continuous efforts to keep taxes low and  remain fiscally responsible while prioritizing the needs of Tennesseans.  The zero-debt budget is a spending plan that advances Republicans’ efforts to strengthen  families, improve public safety, advance education, and create new opportunities  for businesses to grow.  “This budget addresses a diverse range of needs across our state while continuing  our tradition of good fiscal governance,” said House Finance Chair State Rep. Patsy Hazlewood, R-Signal Mountain. “Crafting this budget was a challenge because we are facing  increasing demands due to rising inflation. Tennessee remains a model for  economic prosperity because we’ve managed our spending limits and planned well  for the future.”  Total legislative initiatives make up nearly $21 million in recurring investments and  $141.5 million in nonrecurring expenditures. While revenues have slowed  considerably, Tennessee continues to be among the most fiscally stable states in  the nation with no state income tax and low tax burden overall. The slate of budget and legislative priorities includes significant investments in  rural and behavioral health care with $303 million in new dollars directed to 17  programs. These funds will help to expand bed capacity, fund infrastructure projects for  children’s hospitals and expand access to behavioral health inpatient care.  The budget adds $261 million in new recurring dollars for K-12 education, bringing the total base Tennessee Investment in Achievement (TISA)  budget to $6.8 billion and the overall budget for public education to $8.55 billion.   The new dollars will cover medical insurance premiums, retirement for teachers, and funding for teacher raises to bring the annual starting base salary up to $50,000  by  2026. ...

News

The Tennessee Department of Human Services is asking if you have noticed more benefits on your EBT Card? Some Tennesseans received May 2024 Supplemental...

Latest News

News

The Tennessee House of Representatives this week unanimously passed  legislation  ensuring students in licensed practical nursing (LPN) programs can still qualify for  federal financial aid assistance. House Bill 2378, sponsored by State Rep. Esther Helton-Haynes, R-East Ridge, requires the Tennessee Board of Nursing to set a minimum of 1,296  clock hours, or an equivalent number of credit hours, for practical nursing programs offered at public institutions of higher education in the state. A minimum of 980  hours is currently required.  Beginning July 1, colleges that offer LPN programs longer than the minimum set by  state law or regulatory board will no longer qualify for federal financial aid. House  Bill 2378 will ensure students enrolled in the Tennessee Board of Regents’ (TBR)  LPN  programs, which exceed the current state minimum requirement, remain eligible to receive financial assistance. “It is essential that Tennesseans have opportunities to pursue a career in health  care here at home,” Helton-Haynes said. “This legislation will ensure students can continue to afford to attend  one of the many LPN programs offered across our state. This will not only benefit  them professionally, but it will improve overall health care in Tennessee.”  Private institutions would still be able to maintain their current curriculum lengths in accordance with the Board of Nursing’s rules, according to the legislation. The Tennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT), operated by the TBR, is the  single largest provider of LPNs in the state. During the 2022-23 academic year, 1,186 new LPNs graduated statewide. Tennessee faced a shortfall of 15,700 registered nurses in 2021, according to a  report from the Tennessee Hospital Association. The shortage is expected to lead  to increased demand for LPNs statewide. House Bill 2378 was unanimously approved by the House chamber on April 8. The ...

Sports

Coffee County baseball got a much needed shot in the arm Friday with 13 hits in a 10-3 win over Central Magnet in the...

Obituaries

Obituaries

Barbara Ann Neeley Trammell, age 81 of Manchester, was born on November 11, 1942, to the late Sherman and Julia Irene Qualls, in Manchester....

Obituaries

Nickey Lee Shelton, age 75 of Manchester, was born on February 25, 1949, in Woodbury, TN, to the late Lester and Bessie Shelton. He...

Obituaries

Glenn Arthur Baker, age 65, of Hillsboro, TN passed away on April 17, 2024. He was born on July 2, 1958 to his late parents, Lloyd...

News

A proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that would increase public  safety by allowing bail to be denied for more violent crimes advanced out of the  House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee this week.   House Joint Resolution 869, filed by House Speaker Cameron Sexton, R-Crossville, would expand a judge’s ability to deny bail for certain violent crimes,  including terrorism, second-degree murder, aggravated rape, and grave torture. Current law limits judges’  ability  to deny bail to first-degree murder charges. “Expanding the option for a judge to deny bail for violent offenders helps ensure the safety of all Tennesseans,” said State Rep. Kip Capley, R-Summertown, who is guiding passage of the legislation. “By keeping individuals  charged with violent crimes in custody, there is a reduced risk of them posing a  threat to all Tennesseans.” The proposed amendment would also increase judicial transparency by requiring a  judge or magistrate to explain their reasons for allowing or denying bail for a  defendant. The Tennessee General Assembly in 2022 passed truth in sentencing reform,  which  requires offenders convicted in eight categories of violent crimes to serve 100  percent of their court-imposed sentences before their release. That same year, murders declined 14.6  percent statewide while rapes declined 10.6 percent and kidnappings fell nearly 12  percent when compared to 2021, according to the TBI.  Any proposed amendment to the  Tennessee Constitution must first be approved by two separate General  Assemblies before it can be placed  on the ballot for voters to decide.

News

The Criminal Justice Subcommittee this week advanced legislation that would  prevent teenagers who commit certain violent crimes from purchasing or  possessing a firearm in Tennessee until they turn 25. House Bill 1600, sponsored by State Rep. Ryan Williams, R-Clarksville, would apply to any juvenile 14 years of age or older who was  adjudicated delinquent by a court for committing one of more than a dozen violent offenses  listed in the legislation.  “(This) would not take away anyone’s Second Amendment right,” Williams told  members of the subcommittee Wednesday. “But, it would allow them to delay that  for a short period of time until after the juvenile has been released from the penalty  of their juvenile crimes.” Williams said age 25 is appropriate because brain development is not complete  until that time, according to professional medical associations, including the  National  Institute of Health.  The legislation would apply to those minors whose conduct, if tried as an adult,  would be classified as aggravated assault, aggravated assault against a first  responder or nurse, criminal homicide, robbery, aggravated robbery, especially  aggravated robbery, carjacking, burglary, aggravated burglary, especially aggravated burglary, aggravated cruelty to animals, a threat of mass violence, or any other  criminal offense that involves the use or display of a firearm. If approved, the new law would apply to crimes committed after July 1. Violations  would result in a Class A misdemeanor. 

News

The General Assembly this week unanimously passed legislation that will improve  access to voting for visually impaired Tennesseans.   House Bill 2293, also known as the Print Disability Absentee Voting Act, creates a  process for an accessible electronically-delivered ballot to be delivered to voters with print disabilities that affect their ability to read, write and use printed materials.  “Voting shouldn’t be a burden on any citizen with a disability,” said bill sponsor State Rep. Elaine Davis, R-Knoxville. “This legislation preserves election integrity while providing an accessible ballot for blind Tennesseans to securely and privately cast their ballots.” The legislation requires the coordinator of elections to create an application for  print-disabled Tennesseans to request an electronically-delivered ballot. An application link would also be located on the Tennessee  Secretary of State’s website for voters to submit requests. The bill does not allow  the use of an electronic or digital signature.  House Bill 2293 will now go to Gov. Bill Lee’s desk to be signed into law.