Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Tiffany Clutter

News

The House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee this week advanced  legislation to cut $400 million in taxes by simplifying the state’s franchise tax, which is a tax on a business’s net worth. This adjustment will offer relief to taxpayers,  modernize the way the tax is calculated, and manage newly discovered legal risks.  “Smart, conservative budgeting over the last decade has put our state in a strong  fiscal position to offer equitable relief for businesses and modernize the way our  tax structure is calculated,” said bill sponsor House Majority Leader William  Lamberth, R-Portland. “This legislation will align Tennessee’s franchise tax with surrounding  states. This amendment respects and upholds the public’s right to know by adding  transparency about any rebates that may occur.” House Bill 1893 will restructure Tennessee’s franchise tax to remove the property  measure and authorize the Department of Revenue to issue refunds to taxpayers  who have paid the franchise tax based on property located in the state. A House amendment adds a requirement for any refunds distributed in accordance with this bill to be made public.  It also allows companies who wish to stay under  the current tax structure for the tax period ending before Dec. 31, 2023 to do so. If a  business applying for a refund has also received economic credits or incentives  from the Tennessee Department of Community Development, the credit amount  would be applied to the refund first. The refund eligibility window is now for tax periods that ended on or after March 31, 2022 and refund claims must be filed by Feb 3, 2025. For a business that received economic incentives or credits from the state through the Tennessee Department  of Community Development, the credit received would apply toward the refund.  House Bill 1893 is expected to be heard for consideration in the full House Finance, Ways, and Means Committee on April 2.

News

The General Assembly is considering legislation that aims to provide more career  and technical education (CTE) opportunities for students in rural parts of the state.  House Bill 849, also known as The Rural Schools Innovation Act, would create a  two-year pilot program to provide grants to rural school districts for the expansion of  CTE programs in their high schools.  “The idea is that instead of one school offering three or four average CTE programs, schools can partner with each other and have two great, quality programs,” said bill  sponsor State Rep. Kirk Haston, R-Lobelville. The bill establishes $3 million for grant awards, subject to appropriations. The  Department of Education would oversee grant applications and awards. One  partnership from each region would be chosen to participate. The department  would then  study the effectiveness of the pilot program and submit its findings to the General  Assembly. The proposal will be considered for funding at a later date due to the  cost associated with the legislation.

News

The House chamber paused on Thursday , March 27th to remember the victims of the Covenant School shooting one year after the  horrific  tragedy that claimed six innocent lives. House Joint Resolution 1142 honors the  memories of the three students and three adults who were killed – Evelyn Marie Dieckhaus, Hallie Scruggs, William Kinney, Dr. Katherine Koonce,  Cynthia Broyles Peak and Michael “Mike” Hill. The Metro Nashville Police  Department, the Nashville Fire Department, and the Nashville Department of  Emergency Communications 911 staff were also commended.  The Covenant tragedy turned a heavy spotlight on school safety in the Volunteer  State. Since 2018, Republicans have invested more than $780 million to make  Tennessee public schools safer.  Law makers in 2024 continue to build on the investments. Most notably, these  measures build on investments made through the School Safety Act of 2023, which enacted a multi-tiered plan and provided a school resource officer for every public school.  The  General Assembly also approved $30 million for safety grants for higher education  institutions during the special session on safety in August 2023. 

News

United Way of Highway 55 is now accepting applications for the next allocation  cycle. All nonprofits that serve Coffee, Moore, or Warren County citizens are eligible  to apply for funds. Applications are due May 1st, 2024. Please contact Ashley  Abraham at 931-455-5678 or director@highway55unitedway.org to receive an application.   To fill out  electronically go to this link: https://form.jotform.com/240774289820161 The United Way of Highway 55 believes that all our neighbors deserve a chance to  succeed and live a vibrant life here at home. For everyone to have a fair chance to  succeed, we support four areas that build a good quality of life and a strong  community – education, income, health, and basic essentials.  UWHWY55 is the safest, most effective outlet for donors to make a difference in  their community. We raise funds from a variety of individuals and businesses,  pooling donated resources so we can make significant grants to nonprofit agencies  in Coffee, Moore, Warren Counties.  Abraham states, “Our goal is to raise more  funds, that way we can allocate more every year to the community. All funds raised  here, stay here” Abraham continues by saying, “We distribute funds strategically through our allocations process. The reason why we do this is to protect donated  dollars and place funds where they are most needed and can create the biggest  impact. Nonprofits submit applications and required documents, which the  allocation committee reviews every year. Through this process, we identify how  organizations in our ...

News

The House Corrections Subcommittee recently advanced legislation to protect  Tennessee tax dollars from being used to pay for gender reassignment surgeries for inmates. House Bill 2619, sponsored by State Rep. John Ragan, R-Oak Ridge, would prohibit the Department of Corrections from using state funds to  pay for the procedures or any new hormone replacement therapy for incarcerated  individuals. “We currently have 89 inmates in our state prisons that are getting hormone replacement therapy in preparation for a sex change,” Ragan said Tuesday. “This bill says  that the taxpayer should not be the one to foot a bill for (these procedures).” The proposed legislation would not prevent an inmate from using private funds to  pay for gender surgeries or hormone replacement therapy. House Bill 2619 is  scheduled to be heard in the State Government Committee on March 27.