Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Tiffany Clutter

News

A proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that would increase public  safety by allowing bail to be denied for more violent crimes advanced out of the  House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee this week.   House Joint Resolution 869, filed by House Speaker Cameron Sexton, R-Crossville, would expand a judge’s ability to deny bail for certain violent crimes,  including terrorism, second-degree murder, aggravated rape, and grave torture. Current law limits judges’  ability  to deny bail to first-degree murder charges. “Expanding the option for a judge to deny bail for violent offenders helps ensure the safety of all Tennesseans,” said State Rep. Kip Capley, R-Summertown, who is guiding passage of the legislation. “By keeping individuals  charged with violent crimes in custody, there is a reduced risk of them posing a  threat to all Tennesseans.” The proposed amendment would also increase judicial transparency by requiring a  judge or magistrate to explain their reasons for allowing or denying bail for a  defendant. The Tennessee General Assembly in 2022 passed truth in sentencing reform,  which  requires offenders convicted in eight categories of violent crimes to serve 100  percent of their court-imposed sentences before their release. That same year, murders declined 14.6  percent statewide while rapes declined 10.6 percent and kidnappings fell nearly 12  percent when compared to 2021, according to the TBI.  Any proposed amendment to the  Tennessee Constitution must first be approved by two separate General  Assemblies before it can be placed  on the ballot for voters to decide.

News

The Criminal Justice Subcommittee this week advanced legislation that would  prevent teenagers who commit certain violent crimes from purchasing or  possessing a firearm in Tennessee until they turn 25. House Bill 1600, sponsored by State Rep. Ryan Williams, R-Clarksville, would apply to any juvenile 14 years of age or older who was  adjudicated delinquent by a court for committing one of more than a dozen violent offenses  listed in the legislation.  “(This) would not take away anyone’s Second Amendment right,” Williams told  members of the subcommittee Wednesday. “But, it would allow them to delay that  for a short period of time until after the juvenile has been released from the penalty  of their juvenile crimes.” Williams said age 25 is appropriate because brain development is not complete  until that time, according to professional medical associations, including the  National  Institute of Health.  The legislation would apply to those minors whose conduct, if tried as an adult,  would be classified as aggravated assault, aggravated assault against a first  responder or nurse, criminal homicide, robbery, aggravated robbery, especially  aggravated robbery, carjacking, burglary, aggravated burglary, especially aggravated burglary, aggravated cruelty to animals, a threat of mass violence, or any other  criminal offense that involves the use or display of a firearm. If approved, the new law would apply to crimes committed after July 1. Violations  would result in a Class A misdemeanor. 

News

The General Assembly this week unanimously passed legislation that will improve  access to voting for visually impaired Tennesseans.   House Bill 2293, also known as the Print Disability Absentee Voting Act, creates a  process for an accessible electronically-delivered ballot to be delivered to voters with print disabilities that affect their ability to read, write and use printed materials.  “Voting shouldn’t be a burden on any citizen with a disability,” said bill sponsor State Rep. Elaine Davis, R-Knoxville. “This legislation preserves election integrity while providing an accessible ballot for blind Tennesseans to securely and privately cast their ballots.” The legislation requires the coordinator of elections to create an application for  print-disabled Tennesseans to request an electronically-delivered ballot. An application link would also be located on the Tennessee  Secretary of State’s website for voters to submit requests. The bill does not allow  the use of an electronic or digital signature.  House Bill 2293 will now go to Gov. Bill Lee’s desk to be signed into law. 

News

The General Assembly approved legislation this week that protects foster parents’  religious and moral beliefs while ensuring the best interest of the child. House Bill 2169, also known as the Tennessee Foster and Adoptive Parent  Protection Act, ensures current or prospective adoptive or foster parents in  Tennessee will not be required by the Department of Children’s Services (DCS) to  support any government policy regarding sexual orientation or gender identity that  conflicts with their religious or moral beliefs. The legislation also prevents DCS from denying a parent’s eligibility to foster or adopt a child based on those beliefs. “Tennessee should welcome a diverse range of qualified adoptive and foster parents, including people of faiths and beliefs, and this bill will enforce this idea,” said bill  sponsor State Rep. Mary Littleton, R-Dickson.  “It is important to always consider the best interest of the child.” The religious or moral beliefs of a foster child or their biological family may also be  considered by DCS when determining the most appropriate placement for the child. House Bill 2169 will now head to Gov. Bill Lee’s desk to be signed into law.

News

Legislation aimed at helping fill school resource officer (SRO) vacancies in  Tennessee was approved by the House chamber this week.  House Bill 2682, sponsored by State Rep. Clay Doggett, R-Pulaski, allows retired law enforcement officers to temporarily return to work without losing retirement benefits if certain conditions are met.  “Allowing these retirees to come back into the workforce to fill these voids hopefully will give opportunity for local departments to find qualified officers going forward  after this two-year program,” Doggett said.  Law enforcement officers have to be retired for at least 60 days and can be re-employed for up to a year, with extensions possible.  The General Assembly in 2023 allocated $230 million to enhance school safety,  including $30 million for a school resource officer in every public school in the state. The companion version of House Bill 2682 is still advancing through the Senate. If  approved, the law would take effect July 1. It would be repealed on June 30, 2026.